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Muscle pain can be manageable

December 20, 2017

Muscle pain can be manageable

You work hard all week, so when the weekend finally rolls around, you want to play just as hard. There's nothing like a few rounds of golf, a hike in the mountains, or an intense workout at the gym to help you feel recharged.

 

 

 

 

 

But all of that exercise can cause soreness and stiffness that shows up a day or two later. Don't get sidelined by muscle pain. Find out the causes and treatments so you can stay on your game.

 

 

 

 

 

It's normal to have sore muscles after you work out, play sports, or even do housework. "We call that 'delayed onset' muscle soreness," says Ethel Frese, PT, associate professor of physical therapy at St. Louis University. "It peaks within about 48 hours, and then it will gradually get better."

 

 

 

 

 

If you get sore muscles once in a while, you can take acetaminophen (Tylenol) or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) like aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), or naproxen (Aleve)to help ease the discomfort. Just be cautious about using NSAIDs regularly. Long-term use can interfere with your muscle's ability to repair itself, Goldfarb says.

 

 

 

 

 

Check with your doctor or pharmacist about any interactions these over-the-counter drugs may have with other medications you take. Also, you may need to avoid some medications if you have ulcers, kidney disease, liver disease, or other conditions.

 

 

 

 

 

Sometimes soothing sore muscles requires more than an ice pack or over-the-counter pain reliever. Muscle pain that comes on quickly and feels intense is a sign that you've injured yourself. Call your doctor if your pain is severe or lasts for more than a few days.